May 30, 2019

The Folkloric Origin of the Subli Dance of Batangas from a 1916 Ethnographic Paper
The iconic Batangas dance "subli."
The iconic Batangas dance "subli."
Mention the word baraco and most people in the Philippines immediately think of Batangas, the province with which the liberica species of coffee is most often associated. In the performing arts, there is a dance that is just as instantly associated with Batangas: the “subli,” a hauntingly beautiful dance with contortive moves made by men and women to rhythmic beatings of the drum and clacking of castanets.

May 24, 2019

STCAA:  Tracing the Athletic Association’s Humble Roots and Batangas’ Early Participation
Image extracted from the 1911 publication "Athletic Handbook for Philippine Public Schools."
Image extracted from the 1911 publication "Athletic Handbook for Philippine Public Schools."
In the present day, each year a competition is held to select teams and athletes who will represent Region IV-A in the national games called Palarong Pambansa. These teams and athletes come from the provinces of Cavite, Laguna, Batangas, Rizal and Quezon, otherwise known collectively as the CALABARZON.

The 1907 Philippine Assembly and the First Legislative Districts of Batangas under American Rule
William Howard Taft addressing the Philippine Assembly in 1907.  Image taken from MGOH Gallery. [Public domain]
William Howard Taft addressing the Philippine Assembly in 1907.  Image taken from MGOH Gallery. [Public domain]
In July 1902, the United States Congress passed the so-called Philippine Organic Act, which was the basic law for the Insular Government of the country’s newly-acquired territory of the Philippine Islands. Among the provisions of this law was the creation of an elected Philippine Assembly, depending of the following conditions: a) the ceasing of insurrection against American rule in the islands; b) the completion and publication of a national census; and c) at least two years of peace in the islands along with recognition of American sovereignty1.



May 21, 2019

When Crocodiles and Sharks Swam in Taal Lake
Image credit: Albert Kok~enwiki [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)].
Image credit: Albert Kok~enwiki [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)].
Although, in the present day, the waters of Taal Lake have become completely freshwater, this was not always the case. The lake used to be a bay or inlet that connected to Balayan Bay until it was cut off almost completely by debris cast into the atmosphere by the prolonged 1754 eruption of Taal Volcano. Today, the Pansipit River is the lake’s only link to the bay.

February 28, 2019

The Folkloric Story of Why the Town of Lipa was moved to Its Present Location
Image extracted from a 1962 edition of The Chronicle Magazine.
From an ethnographic paper entitled “Folklore from Lipa, Batangas1,” written by one Amparo Reyes, we extract this otherwise forgotten folkloric story of why Lipa transferred to its present location. The story is not historical at all and must have been told to pass the time or impart virtues upon children.

February 27, 2019

When President Manuel L. Quezon Praised Batangas for Its Self-Sufficiency
A typical American era street scene in the Philippines.  Image source:  Scrapbook of Clyde Tavenner, online at the Internet Archive.
A typical American era street scene in the Philippines.  Image source:  Scrapbook of Clyde Tavenner, online at the Internet Archive.
Erstwhile “confidential records1” of Philippine Commonwealth President Manual L. Quezon’s conferences with the press in 1936 showed how high the level of esteem was with which he held the people of Batangas. This was just a year after the commonwealth came into existence.

February 22, 2019

Narciso Claveria’s 1849 Decree and the Surnames of the People of Lipa
Women of the Red Cross Society of Lipa, early 1900s.  Image source:  “The Story of the Lopez Family: A Page from the History of the War in the Philippines.”
Women of the Red Cross Society of Lipa, early 1900s.  Image source:  “The Story of the Lopez Family: A Page from the History of the War in the Philippines.”
In the early days of the Spanish colonial era in the Philippines, as the indios or native Filipinos converted to Christianity, many such natives also started taking on Spanish names: of Catholic saints, symbols, sacraments and feasts and even the names of Popes. There was, as yet, no definitive system for administrative purposes so that it was not uncommon for native Filipinos to take two or three names and change these whenever it took their fancy.

February 19, 2019

The Heroic Women Civilian Volunteers of Nasugbu in WWII
Image credit:  Wayne Violette.  American troops marching into Nasugbu town after the beach landing.  Colorized courtesy of Algorithmia.
In 1944, probably in anticipation of the subsequent landing of the United States 8th Army early the following year, the Hunters/ROTC Guerrillas transferred their headquarters from the town of Infanta in Tayabas (present-day Quezon) to Cutad in the mountainous area of Nasugbu in Batangas. The guerrilla group was one of several operating in Batangas gathering intelligence for the US Army, harassing Japanese troops, keeping peace and order in the towns and dealing with collaborators, among others1.

February 15, 2019

Apolinario Mabini’s Letters to the Philippine Commission Seeking an Armistice Early in the Fil-Am War
Captured Filipino "insurgents" with American soldiers during the Philippine-American War. Image extracted from the public domain book "Souvenir of the 8th Army Corps Philippine Expedition:  a Pictorial History." Colorized courtesy of Algorithmia.
Captured Filipino "insurgents" with American soldiers during the Philippine-American War. Image extracted from the public domain book "Souvenir of the 8th Army Corps Philippine Expedition:  a Pictorial History." Colorized courtesy of Algorithmia.
The December 1898 Treaty of Paris formally ended the Spanish-American War; and as the defeated nation, Spain officially “relinquished all claims of sovereignty” to several of its territories, including the Philippines1. The Philippine government under Emilio Aguinaldo, which had been led to believe that the United States had fought Spain with the intent of assisting the Filipinos attain independence, was not even represented in the negotiations leading to this treaty, although it had sent Don Felipe Agoncillo to try and get representation.

February 13, 2019

Fernando Air Base and the 1989 Coup Attempt vs Cory Aquino’s Government
A T-28 Trojan aircraft at the gate of Fernando Air Base.
A T-28 Trojan aircraft at the gate of Fernando Air Base.
Although Corazon Aquino was swept to power by the hugely popular “People Power Revolution” in 1986, her presidency – which lasted until 1992 – was not without dissent, especially from certain sectors within the armed forces. These sectors ultimately boiled down to two: supporters of the deposed former President Ferdinand E. Marcos and – ironically because they were instrumental in the ascension of Aquino to the Presidency – the Reform the Armed Forces Movement (RAM)1.

February 7, 2019

The Legend of the Gabi (Taro) as Told in Malvar Batangas
Image source: Thierry Caro assumed (based on copyright claims).  No machine-readable source provided. Own work assumed (based on copyright claims)., CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=353479.
Image source: Thierry Caro assumed (based on copyright claims).  No machine-readable source provided. Own work assumed (based on copyright claims)., CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=353479.
From the 1950s document “History and Cultural Life of the People of Malvar, Batangas1,” we get this obscure little legend about the origin of the gabi, or taro as it is called in English, a crop known for its edible starchy root and edible leaves. It also goes by the scientific name colocasia esculenta2.

January 29, 2019

A Folkloric Tale of a Marian Apparition that Led to the Building of the Lipa Cathedral
The Lipa Cathedral right after World War II.  Image source:  United States National Archives.  Colorized courtesy of Algorithmia.
The Lipa Cathedral right after World War II.  Image source:  United States National Archives.  Colorized courtesy of Algorithmia.
From an ethnographic paper1 written by one Amparo Reyes, presumably from the then-town of Lipa in Batangas, we get this folkloric story about why the church in the town was built. The paper is part of a collection of similar papers archived at the National Library of the Philippines, amassed by the American anthropologist Henry Otley-Beyer, who was the sole Anthropology professor at the University of the Philippines early during the American colonial era2.