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January 2, 2018

Lian, Batangas (Poblacion): Historical Data

Full transcription of the so-called “Historical Data” for the barrio the Municipality of Lian, Batangas, the original scanned documents at the National Library of the Philippines Digital Collections not having OCR or optical character recognition properties. This transcription has been edited for grammar, spelling and punctuation where possible. The original pagination is provided for citation purposes.

[Attached Letter.]

Bureau of Public Schools
DIVISION OF BATANGAS
Batangas


August 14, 1953

The Director
Bureau of Public Schools
Manila

S i r:

I have the honor to submit herewith the historical data gathered in the municipalities of Tanauan, Lian, and Calatagan of this Division.

Very respectfully,
(For the Div. Supt. of Schools)



ANGEL R. HORNILLA
Asst. Div. Supt. of Schools

[Cover page.]

BUREAU OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS
DIVISION OF BATANGAS
DISTRICT OF LIAN
Lian Elementary School



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HISTORY AND CULTURAL LIFE OF THE TOWN OF LIAN,
BATANGAS AND ITS SIX (6) BARRIOS

1. Lian (Poblacion)
2. Binubusan
3. Kapito
4. Maraluhatan
5. Prenza
6. Puting Kahoy
7. San Diego



---------- o0o ----------



References:

1. Executive Order No. 486
2. Appendix to Executive Order No. 486
3. B.P.S. General Memorandum No. 34, s. 1952



---------- o0o ----------

Prepared, Compiled, and Arranged by a Committee of
Principals and Treasurers during the School Year
1952-1953

1. Mr. D. Figueroa Chairman
2. Mr. T. V. Dahoyag, Asso. Chairman
3. Mr. F. J. Jonson, Member
4. Mr. B. L. Bonuan, Member
5. Mr. Ben Lejano, Member
6. Mr. G. Laparan, Member
7. Mr. G. Hernandez, Consultant and Adviser

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. Letter of Transmittal Page 1
II. Foreword of the District Supervisor Page 2
III. History and Cultural Life of the town (Poblacion) Page 3
IV. History and Cultural Life of the Barrio Binubusan Page 15
V. History and Cultural Life of the Barrio Kapito Page 30
VI. History and Cultural Life of the Barrio Maraluhatan Page 34
VII. History and Cultural Life of the Barrio Prenza Page 37
VIII. History and Cultural Life of the Barrio Puting Kahoy Page 41
IX. History and Cultural Life of the Barrio San Diego Page 46
X. Names and Signatures of the Chairmen and Members of the Committee who prepared and submitted the Report Page 52

[Attached letter.]

BUREAU OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS
DIVISION OF BATANGAS
DISTRICT OF LIAN
Lian Elementary School

June 28, 1953

The Director of Public Libraries
Manila, Philippines
(Through official channels)

Sir:

In compliance with the requirements of Executive Order No. 486 of His Excellency, the President of the Philippines, and its Appendix, I have the honor to submit and forward herewith the original copy of the manuscript on historical data and record on [the] cultural life of the town of Lian, Batangas and its six (6) existing barrios. The new history, data, information, and materials on the life and culture of the people of this municipality were gathered and collected, compiled and arranged by a local committee of teachers from this municipality during the school year 1952-1953 to comply with the provisions of General Memorandum No. 34, s. of 1952 of the Director of Public Schools.

Very respectfully,

DAMASO FIGUEROA
Principal
(Chairman of the Local Committee)

Noted:


GAUCENCIO HERNANDEZ
District Supervisor

GREGORIO LARDIZABAL
Division Superintendent of Schools
[Foreword.]

F O R E W O R D

     The customs, traditions, and mores of a group of people are best depicted in the history and folkways of the place where that group of people lives. It is for this reason that the historical data of the municipality of Lian, together with all its barrios and sitios, have been collected and compiled. It is believed that in so doing, the desirable customs, traditions, and mores of the people of the said municipality will be preserved on to posterity. If in this compilation, some undesirable customs, traditions, and mores have been incorporated, they have been done so for cultural motives. They have been incorporated for us, the living, to remember and appreciate – not to do. The embodiment of the cultural value of knowledge is manifest thereby.
     I wish to express my deep sense of appreciation to the local committee of Lian teachers, headed by their principal, Mr. Damaso Figueroa, for the untiring efforts that they exerted to make a reality this historical compilation of Lian.
     If this compilation will contribute a step forward in the intellectual advancement of the people of Lian, then the efforts of the local committee of teachers that made this history a reality will not have been in vain.
     June 30, 1953

Sgd.:

GAUDENCIO HERNANDEZ
District Supervisor
District of Lian
Division of Batangas

[p. 1]

HISTORY AND CULTURAL LIFE OF THE TOWN

Part One – History

Bordering the China Sea in western Batangas, with ardent agitation [verdant vegetation?] in hilly terrain with an area of 8,769 hectares, is the town of Lian.

Founded in 1760 by the Chinese traders, there are no written records of the names of its settlers. That the early founders of the town were Chinese is furnished by its old residents who obtained information from their forefathers. This is further supported by the fact that some of the family names of the residents are of Chinese derivation. The Chinese came here to trade. Some of them made a permanent settlement in this town and established themselves as retailers. They enjoyed ease and comfort in the town.

Records are wanting how this town had its first name, who named it and how it acquired its present name. Known information from the old residents had it that the first name of this towns was Lia, the name of the head of the first group of Chinese traders who settled here. There is no significance that may be attached to the former name of this town.

With the coming of the Spaniards to the Philippines, they planted the Christian religion in this town. They found the early settlers to be Chinese. When the Chinese was asked what the name of this town was, they answered Lia, but the Spaniards undertook [understood] it to be Lian, its present name. Because the religion of the Chinese was inimical to the religion of the Spaniards, the latter drove the Chinese away. From a small barrio of Nasugbu since this establishment up to the early part of the twentieth century, from the sheer determination of the natives to own a piece of land and to be free, the natives defied the foreign tyrants and asserted their defiance in bloody encounters with the foreigners, and from this determination of the natives now stands the present town of LIAN with its residents living in peace and democracy.

That the present official name of the town is LIAN, which is governed by elected officials.

Names of persons who hold leading official positions in the community with the rates of their tenure: With the exception of the public documents kept after the liberation of the town, there are no available records showing the names of persons who had held leading official positions in the community during the past. However, the following persons are given as obtained from Mr. Francisco Lejano, an old resident of the town who had been a “Kapitan” during the Spanish regime and the first Municipal President when the town was separated from Nasugbu:

Leading Officials During the Spanish Time

1. Macario Lejano
2. Guardiano Malinay
3. Eusebio Malinay

[p. 2]

4. Zacarias Lamano
5. Cosme Malinay
6. Hilario Monilo
7. Mateo Laparan
8. Crisanto Lamano
9. Mariano Jonson
10. Mariano Malinay
11. Gregorio Jonson
12. Manuel Lama
13. Agapito Aquino
14. Sancho Villanueva
15. Arcadio Layosa
16. Hilarion Limjoco
17. Pedro Tinchuangco
18. Felipe Ramos
19. Francisco Lejano

Municipal Presidents During the American Time
N a m e Rate of Tenure
1.  Mr. Mariano San Agustin 1901-1903
2.  Mr. Damaso Villadolid 1903-1905
3.  Mr. Mariano San Agustin 1905-1906
4.  Mr. Catalino Villadolid 1906-1908
5.  Mr. Panfilo Jugo 1908-1909
6.  Mr. Petronilo Ureta 1909-1910
7.  Mr. Aurelio Oriondo 1910-1912
8.  Mr. Petronilo Ureta 1912-1915
NOTE: From the year 1901 up to the year 1915, Lian was annexed and made part of Nasugbu; hence, the above-named persons were residents of the said town.

Municipal Presidents of Lian after Its Separation from Nasugbu, Batangas
N a m e Rate of Tenure
 1.  Mr. Francisco Lejano 1915-1916
 2.  Mr. Galicano Limjoco 1916
 3.  Mr. Francisco Limjoco 1916-1917
 4.  Mr. Teofilo Jonson 1917-1920
 5.  Mr. Damaceno Limon 1920-1926
 6.  Mr. David Lapitan 1926-1929
 7.  Mr. Hilarion Lejano 1929-1932
 8.  Mr. Damaceno Limon 1932-1935
 9.  Mr. Marcelo Apacible 1935-1938
10. Mr. Hilarion Lejano 1938-1940
11. Mr. Marcelo Apacible 1940-1942
Municipal Mayors During the Japanese Occupation
N a m e Rate of Tenure
1.  Mr. Gregorio Zarzoso 1942-
2.  Atty Meliton Lejano 1942-1945
[p. 3]



Municipal Mayors after the Liberation
N a m e Rate of Tenure
1.  Major Lucas G. Baviera 1945-
2.  Mr. Marcelino Apacible 1945-1946
Municipal Mayors under the Philippine Republic
N a m e Rate of Tenure
1.  Mr. Quirino Lejano 1946-1951
2.  Mr. Lucas R. Nueve 1951-present
Data on historical sites, structures, buildings, old ruins, etc.: The only remaining historical structures which had been spared by the flight of time and wars and, which had been up to the present standing on its feet are the Hacienda Lian and the Roman Catholic church, both of which are owned by the Colegio San Jose. Other than these, no more historical buildings or ruins could be traced.

Important facts, incidents or events that to place:

(a) During the Spanish occupation: There are no official records which show important facts, incidents or events that took place in the community, but it may be stated that there were many encounters made against the Spaniards by the revolutionary forces in their efforts to overthrow the government and establish a republic of their own. Many revolutionary veterans of Lian fought against the Spanish soldiers and suffered irreparable casualties because of the superior force of the enemy. It is worthwhile to mention that before the revolutionary period, Lian was made an hacienda by the friars, claiming legal ownership of the land and subjected the inhabitants to pay exorbitant taxes which were based on the Ecclesiastical Law.

(b) During the American occupation to World War II - During this period, many incidents or events are worthy of records, a few among them were the continued defiance of the inhabitants of Lian to recognize the legal ownership of the friars. In this agrarian trouble, the late President Manuel L. Quezon took time to come to this place to see for himself the social unrest of the people. The Colegio de San Jose was represented by Mr. Nelson V. Sinclair, while the inhabitants were ably represented by some civic-spirited leaders namely: Mr. Ambrosio G. Jonson (one of the 48 martyrs who died during the zonification of Lian by the Japanese M.P.), Mr. Francisco Lejano, better known as “Kapitan” Isko, Mr. Angel T. Limjoco, Mr. Hilarion Lejano and many others. The late President Quezon, after carefully considering the angles of the case, placed the town under martial law. However, in the ensuing years, the tension eased down and both parties did not resort to any extreme measures. This event took place sometime in the year 1935-1936.

[p. 4]

The Rural Progress Administration, a branch of the government, had done splendid work in avoiding any possible bloodshed by buying some portions of land and reselling them to the occupants and/or tenants. Thus ended the problem of the inhabitants and the friars.

Another incident was the infamous conflagration which broke out when almost all the houses within the poblacion were razed to the ground, causing thousands of inhabitants to be homeless and finding themselves confronting insurmountable poverty. This had been considered as the worst calamity [that] ever happened in the history of Lian. That was on January 6, 1939.

(c) During and after World War II - After the treacherous attack of the Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on December 7, 1941, able-bodied citizens and reservists of this town of Lian rallied to the frontlines in defense of democracy. As the town is bordering the China Sea and considered [a] strategic point for military and naval operations, members of the Philippine Army then inducted to the USAFFE built their defense lines along the shores. They installed barbed wire trenches from the shores of Nasugbu to the shores of Lian, including its outlying barrios facing the sea. The town was protected by the members of the Philippine Army who were assigned in this area, but some of the civilians had evacuated to the mountains coupled with the spirit of patriotism and cooperation, the inhabitants of the town, particularly the male inhabitants, we organized into [the] Bolo Battalion headed by Mr. Teofilo L. Laqui.

It was fortunate enough that the Japanese invaders did not land on the shores of Lian and no fighting took place. Our forces moved to Bataan and fought against the ruthless invaders. When General Wainright issued an order to surrender, soldiers from this town, unwilling to submit to defeat to the Japanese, defied such an order and instead, beyond our expectation came home with experience of battle wrought on their faces. The fall of Bataan and Corregidor was a shock to the peace and liberty-loving people in this town. Part of the Japanese occupation forces occupied the town of Lian and appointed its officials. Appointed as Mayor-Treasurer by the Japanese military command was the late Gregorio Zarzoso, with Mr. Vicente Villafria as the Chief of Police. It is worthy to note that the elected mayor prior to the occupation, Mr. Marcelo Apacible, left the town and hid from the Japanese to evade rendering service during the Japanese time. Motivated by the undying love and devotion to the mother country, once again, the able-bodied male citizens of this town rallied to the underground movement. In the latter part of 1942, underground forces were organized in Lian. Worthy of mention among them was a unit under the Anderson’s Guerrillas able commanded by Mr. Conrado Limjoco. The men under him extended voluntary intelligent activities not only in Lian but also along the coast of Batangas province which at that time was being fortified by the enemy.

[p. 5]

The strength and frontier of the Japanese forces, their arms and supplies were meticulously plotted on maps and relayed to General Headquarters. Captain Mamerto Jonson also played an important role in this underground resistance with Mr. Faustino G. Jonson supplying him with all the pertinent documents and maps pilfered from the Japanese Headquarters.

In the latter part of 1944, American planes began strafing the Japanese positions along the seacoast, inflicting heavy damages. But, before these men could realize the fruits of their labor, they were apprehended by the enemy among whom where the 48 martyrs. They were subjected to all forms of inhuman punishments that only men with the convictions to see their country free could withstand. The 48 men were killed just two weeks before the Americans landed but they did not die in vain the town was liberated by the Americans on January 31, 1945.

(d) Destruction of lives, properties and institutions during wars, especially in 1896-1900 and 1941-1945 - No records or information are available regarding the distractions cost during the war in 1896-1900. During the war in 1941-1945, the following distractions of lives are given based on the inscriptions on the marker-symbol in the town plaza which is dedicated for the purpose:

DEDICATED BY THE PEOPLE OF LIAN TO
THE MEMORY OF THEIR MARTYRS WHO
WERE EXECUTED BY THE JAPANESE ON
JANUARY 16, 1945

THEIR ONLY CRIME WAS LOYALTY TO
THE ALLIED CAUSE
ABELLAR, EUFEMIO LIMJOCO, JOVENCIO
ADRIAS, JOSE LIRA, ESTEBAN
AQUINO, PEDRO LOOC, FELIX
ATIENZA, MIGUEL LUIS, JUANITIO DE
BAVIERA, ROMUALDO MACALAGUIM, CAYETANO
CARAIG, AMANDO MAGAHIS, FLORENTINO
FACTOR, FORTUNATO MAGNO, MARIANO
FAGARA, SEVERINO MAGTAAS, LORETO
GARCES, JOSE MASIPAG, CRISPIN
GUTIERREZ, RUFINO MASIPAG, POLICARPIO
ILAGAN, AGATON MASUSI, GELACIO
JONSON, ALEJANDRO MEDRANO, MARCIAL
JONSON, AMBROSIO MEDRANO, TEODULO
JONSON, GREGORIO S. MERCADO, JOSE
JONSON, GREGORIO V. NEBREJA, REMIGIO
JONSON, MANUEL REYES, ARSENIO
LAGRISOLA, VALENDIN RUIZ, NARCISO
LAGUARDIA, ALFONSO SANCHEZ, BUENAVENTURA
LAGUERTA, GUILLERMO SANCHEZ, VIVENCIO
LAGUS, PIO SEMENIANO, APOLONIO
LEJANO, FRANCISCO SEMENIANO, SINFOROSO
LEJANO, GUILLERMO TAN, ZOILO
LEON, CORNELIO DE VERGARA, LIBRADO
LIMJOCO, CESAR VERGARA, LORENZO
[p. 6]

On the other side of the marker-symbol are inscribed the following:

DEDICATED BY A GRATEFUL PEOPLE TO THEIR
IMMORTALS WHO DIED IN BATTLE

HEROES OF BATAAN
ALONSO, FRANCISCO LAMANO, QUITERIO
BASCUGUIN, JULIAN LAPITAN, PABLO
BONUAN, ELISEO LAYOSA, BIENVENIDO
CABALI, ARSENIO LEJANO, TRANQUILINO
DALISAY, ELIGIO LIMJOCO, JUANITO
DERIQUITO, GUILLERMO MEDRANO, NORITO
FRANCISCO, PIO MENESES, BENIGNO
JONSON, HOSPICIO SISON, ANDRES
LAGUS, AGUSTIN TINCHUANGCO, ELADIO
LAMANO, BLAS
(e) Measures and accomplishments toward rehabilitation and reconstruction following World War II - There have been marked accomplishments toward rehabilitation and reconstruction of the town following World War II. Despite the insurmountable poverty of the inhabitants caused by the last war, through their industry and hard work, they were able to stand on their feet. Their homes where reconstructed, farms were cultivated and increased their production through the application of fertilizers distributed by the government. Those whose properties we're wantonly destroyed by the ravages of war where paid by the War Damage Commission. Similarly, heirs of deceased veterans and their dependents filed claims with a different agencies of the U.S. Government such as the U.S. Veterans administration, the War Claims Commission, and a considerable number already receiving pensions are enjoying these benefits.

Part Two: FOLKWAYS

Traditions, customs, and practices in domestic and social life; birth, baptism, courtship, marriage, death, burial; visits; festivals; punishments, etc.

(a) Traditions – The inhabitants of Lian hold tightly to the fundamental concepts that day constitute themselves the primary virtues of life. A few among the common traditions which had been to this time embraced and adhered to by the people are the following:

1. Religious festival – It is the common practice among the people of the town especially the poor to hold religious banquets in honor of the image of St. John the Baptist. They would get the image of the same from the church, bring it home and pray for it. At the same time, they would prepare a feast, invite many prominent citizens in the neighborhood and entertain them lavishly, especially at the table. This

[p. 7]

tradition is believed to bring prosperity and good health to those who stick to it, while a few regard the same as pure idiocy because it only makes the poor still poorer.

2. Celebration of the Crucifix – A great majority of the people still cling to the tradition of celebrating the black crucifix which was reportedly found in Barrio Cruz of this town, many hundred years ago. It is the religious conviction of the folks that this crucifix shows miracles to devout Catholics. Since then, a sort of commemoration is held during the month of May of each year. They would construct a small chapel, usually called as “kubol,” place the crucifix inside, make floral offerings and the like. But the most peculiar offering in this celebration is the native dance, participated in by many pairs of men and women, either young or old, to the accompaniment of music, mostly of string instruments. This rare occasion attracts many spectators to their delight.

3. Customs in domestic and social life. – The customs regarding the domestic and social lives of the people are rarely found in other towns. They still adhere to their old practices which they consider as the best. Examples of which are the kissing of the hands of the old folks by the younger set during vesper hours or at night, the hospitality shown to visitors, etc. They are also a hardworking and peaceful people. They do not divert themselves from this kind of life and are not influenced by other undesirable factors because humility and courtesy are their primary virtues. The only defect of the people is that they would not want to separate from the old tradition of confining their children to the same place where they first saw the light of day. Family attachment had been so dear to them so that the young generation were not given a break to pursue higher education and learning in other places. However, a few among them are beginning to learn this custom to be destructive to the economic and social advancement.

4. Birth, baptism, courtship, marriage, death, burial, etc. – From time immemorial, verbs of infants in this town are attended by unregistered midwives locally known asn "hilots," aided by attendance called "salag." It is customary on the part of the father of the child just born to celebrate the delivery by displaying fireworks, so much so when the child happens to be a boy. Immediately after the delivery of the child, both husband and wife talked about the future godparents. Once they have selected, the husband goes to them and with due respect and in all humility, informs them of his mission which is always delightfully accepted. After a week or two, the pre-baptismal celebration is held. This is called "buhos-tubig." The services of the "manang" are requested for the temporary baptism of the child. Usually, the parents prepare some food by killing two or three chickens for the "compadre" and "comadre" to feast.

[p. 8]

When the child reaches the age of one month or more, the parents prepare him to be baptized in church. The godparents by the necessary clothes (barong binyagan) of the child and they go to church and have him baptized. It is often observed that when the parents of the child baptized belong to a well-to-do family, [a] brass band is hired for the purpose of making the occasion lively. They also offer their "compadre" and "comadre" roasted pig as "sabit." in turn, the godparents give the child some presents, either in money or in kind. This is commonly called as "pakimkim." A big feast is also held at dinner and the neighbors are cordially invited.

Courtship and marriage in this place are quite strange as compared with the latest custom. Courtship is not made between the boy and girl in most cases but, between the parents of both parties. The parents of the girl would demand from the other party many things before they could win the hands of their daughter. Instances, the boy would be required to serve them for several years before he could be successful in his suit. They are doing this in order to test the sincerity of his affection and love for their daughter. Once the young lover meet the full satisfaction of his future father and mother-in-law, a fixed date is set for the marriage. The marriage ceremony is held in the same manner as what is being observed these days. After this marriage, but always in the girl's home. Before eating, the newlywed couple go around the table and carry with them wooden tubs for their relatives to wash their hands. But, as they saw their hands in the tubs, they drop some silver coins. For a prosperous skin, he drops earring which means that he will offer the couple either a carabao or a cow. The ring is known as “tag-ikaw.”

Death and burial practices in this town are similar to almost all places in the Philippines. When a person dies, it is the customary practice of the relatives and kind neighbors of the deceased to visit the dead and pay their last respects, some of whom bring with them alms, either in money or in kind in order to alleviate or assuage the grief of the bereaved family. They gather in the house during the whole night and pray for the salvation of the dead's soul. The next day during the burial, members of the bereaved family, as well as the relatives and friends, join the funeral to the cemetery. For the rich families, [the] burial of their dead relatives are held in a grand manner. They hire the services of the brass band and priests during the internment.

After the burial, prayers are offered by the old folks in the house for nine consecutive nights while the younger folks play numerous kinds of games to pass the night. [The] Most common of these games are the "En Floron;" "Punong Halaman;" "Duplo;" "Higit-lubay;" and many others. On the 9th day, a feast is offered, especial-

[p. 9]

ly to those who have some way or another given material help to the bereaved family. This feast is found very common among the poor people.

Visits – Visitors coming to this town find themselves comfortable and at ease and very few like staying in their homes. This is, perhaps, to the exceptional hospitality and respect shown by the people of this place who regard and consider them as honorable guests. The truth of these facts will be noticed from some persons who have made this town as their permanent residence.

Festivals – There are few festivals celebrated in this town each year. They are the town fiesta which falls on June 24 of every year; the Liberation Day which is held every 31st day of January; the Independence and the Rizal Day celebrations on July 4 and December 30, respectively.

Resource Person: [Signature unreadable.]

Myths, legends, beliefs, interpretations, superstitions

No records or information are available.

Popular Songs –

Ang Bayan Kong Pilipinas

Ang bayan kong Pilipinas
Lupain ng ginto’t bulaklak
Pag-ibig ko sa kanya’y palad
Nag-alay ng ganda’t dilag
At sa kanyang yumi at ganda
Dayuhan ay nahalina
Bayan ko’y binihag ka
Nasadlak sa dusa.

Ibon mang may layang lumipad
Kulungin mo at umiiyak
Bayan pa kayang sakdal dilag
Ang di magnasang makaalpas
Pilipinas kong minumutya
Mindanao, Luzon at Visaya
Aking adhika,
Makita kang sakdal laya.
(End)

Nasaan Ka Irog

Nasaan ka irog
Nasaan ka irog at dagling naparam
Ang iyong pag-ibig
Di baga sumpa mong ako’y mamahalin
Iyong itatangi,
Iyong itatangi, magpahanggang libing.

[p. 10]

Subali’t nasaan, ang dati mong
pagtingin?
Bakit natitiis mong ako’y
mangulila, at hanap-hanapin
Ikaw sa ala-ala.
Nasaan ang sabi mong
Ako’y iyong ligaya
Ngayo’y nalulungkot,
Ngayo’y nalulungkot,
Ay di ka makita.

Irog ko’y tandaan
Kung ako man ay iyong
Ngayo’y siniphayo
Mga sumpa’t paglalambing
Pinaram mong buo
Ang lahat sa buhay ko
Ay di maglalaho,
Magsisilbing bakas
Ng nagdaan ‘tang
Pagsuyo.
Nasaan ka irog,
Nasaan ka irog.
(End)

Bituing Marikit

Bituing marikit, sa gabi ng buhay,
Ang bawa’t kislap mo’y ligaya ang taglay
Yaring aking puso’y, iyong patnubayan
Na kahit na sinag, iyong bahagi man.
Matanim sa puso ko, yaong isang pag-ibig
Na pinakasasamba, sa loob ng dibdib.
Sa iyong luningning, ako’y laging nasasabik
Ikaw ang pangarap, bituing marikit.

Lapitan mo ako, halina bituin,
At ating pag-isahin ang mga damdamin
Ang sabik kong diwa’y, huwag mong uhawin
Sa batis ng iyong wagas na paggiliw.
(End)

Pusong Wasak

Pagkatapos kong mawalay
Ang puso ko’y biglang nalumbay
Ninais kong malimutan
Ang saklap niyaring aking abang buhay
Ang tangi kong kaulayaw,
Ay luhang di mapigilan
Dahil sa hirap
Na aking dinaramdam
At ngayon ako’y nabilanggo
Sa hinalang kasalanan ko
Ang pangakong ligaya ko
Ay saklap ng buhay ko
Ang awit ng ibong sawi
Ang awa mo ang siyang hinihingi
At sa lahat ng sandali

[p. 11]

Ikaw rin ang siyang mithi
Kay lungkot ng buhay ko
Na nilimot mo na liyag
Mga saksi kahirapan
Nitong aking pusong wasak.
(End)

Games and Amusements:

1. Softball
2. Ping-pong
3. Basketball
4. Sipa
5. Tubig
6. Pika
7. Luksong Tinik, etc.

Proverbs and Sayings:

(a) Proverbs –

1. Sibat ni Adan, hindi mabilang (Ulan)
Swords of Adam, cannot be counted. (Rain)

2. Dalawang batang maliksi
Kung dumumi’y sa tabi. (Mata)
Two quick little boys,
Move their bowels in the corners. (Eyes)

3. Baboy ko sa kaingin
Tumataba’y walang pakain. (Kamote)
My pig at the “kaingin,”
Grows fat without food. (Camote)

4. Taong-buhay, ina-anay. (Bulutonggo)
Living man, destroyed by termites. (Man with smallpox)

(b) Sayings –

1. Tuso man ang matsing, napaglalalangan din.
However clever the monkey is, it can be fooled.

2. Pag may hirap, may ginhawa.
Where there is hardship, there is comfort.

3. Kung talagang tubo, matamis hanggang dulo.
A real sugarcane is sweet till the end.

4. Ang bayaning masugatan, nag-iibayo ang tapang.
A wounded hero becomes braver than ever.

5. Ang taong hindi marunong lumingon sa kanyang pinanggalingan, ay hindi makararating sa kanyang paroroonan.
A person who does not know how to look back from where he came cannot expect to reach his destination.

[p. 12]

Methods of measuring time, special calendars - People of the town during the olden times measured time by looking [at] the position of the sun during daytime and the stars at nighttime, and the moon served as their special calendar.

Other folk tales - No records or information are available.

Resource Person: [Sgd.] Honorio Jonson

Part Three : Other Information

Information on books and documents treating of the Philippines and the names of their owners - No records or information are available.

Name of Filipino authors born or residing in the community, the titles and subjects of their works, whether printed or in manuscript form, and the names of the persons possessing them -

(a) ANTONIO JONSON – Born in Lian, Batangas, author of a book entitled “The Alphabet of Gardening.” Most schools, both public and private throughout the Philippines, are in possession of his very useful book which had been approved by the Director of the defunct Bureau of Education as reference for teachers and pupils in gardening.

Resource Person: [Sgd.] Eustaquio Jonson

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Notes and references:
Transcribed from “History and Cultural Life of the Town (Lian)” 1953, online at the National Library of the Philippines Digital Collections.

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