Internal US Army Memo on the Batangas Town Bn's Request for Reconsideration - Batangas History, Culture and Folklore

Internal US Army Memo on the Batangas Town Bn's Request for Reconsideration

The Batangas Town Battalion, Army of the United States of America (AUSA), claimed to have received its authority to organize from one Major Ramon Ruffy, one of the prominent guerrilla leaders based in Mindoro during the Japanese occupation. This supposed unit was at one time affiliated with the Batangas Town Guerrillas of the Fil-American Irregular Troops (FAIT). It broke away from the FAIT when it was not attached to the 11th Airborne during the liberation period, since the United States Army only needed one company of the Batangas Town Guerrillas. It ultimately failed to obtain official recognition by the US Army. In this page is a transcription1 internal United States Army communications with regards to the Batangas Town Battalion’s request for reconsideration as sent by its supposed commanding officer Pablo Aguila.
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HEADQUARTERS
PHILIPPINES-RYUKYUS COMMAND
OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF, G-3
OFFICE RETAINED RECORD

G-3 File No. GSCPU 091 PI Date 14 Apr 48

MEMORANDUM FOR RECORD

Lt Col Wallace M. Hanes:

1. Basic, letter from Mr. Pablo Aguila to CG PHILRYCOM, dated 30 March 48, requesting information regarding action taken on the request for reconsideration of the Batangas Town Bn, AUSA.

2. This unit was not favorably considered for recognition by this hq on 28 June 46. Mr. Aguila’s request of 11 Jan 47 for reconsideration of this unfavorable decision was accepted by this hq on 7 June 47. No further action was taken. Our reply to Mr. Aquila’s letter of 30 March 48, therefore, constitutes action on the request for reconsideration of the unit. Throughout the letter of 30 March 48, Mr. Aguila stresses the casualty recognition of Dominador Rivera as being indicative to the action to be taken on his request. Dominador River was recognized independently as a casualty as a member of the Batangas Town Battalion for record purposes only. Par 5 of our letter of recognition of this individual states that the recognition will not be used as a basis for recognition by the remainder of the unit.

3. The Batangas Town Bn, AUSA cannot be favorably considered for the following reasons:
a. The unit claims to have been organized in Sept 42 and to have joined the Batangas Town Guerrillas, FAIT, in Oct 44. No evidence was submitted or could be found to substantiate any activity during this period. The unit claims solely to have kept alive the hopes of the people in the return of the Americans. However patriotic, this cannot be considered as a basis for recognition.
b. In Oct 44, when Pablo Aguila joined forces with Anselmo Beredo of the Batangas Town Guerrillas, FAIT, he became his executive officer. The 11th Airborne Div had use for one company of this unit. Anselmo Beredo commanded this company, later recognized, leaving Pablo Aguila discontented with his remaining members. Aguila, therefore, reformed his Batangas Town Bn, AUSA, on 30 March 45. At the same time, he went to work for the 592nd Engineer Regt as a paid civilian employee, ordering his remaining few men to do likewise.

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M/R (Cont’d):

c. The additional evidence submitted by Mr. Aguila with his request for reconsideration consists of two affidavits. One is signed by Major Ramon Ruffy and the other by Major Florentino Medina, each attempting to establish the claim of Aguila to have commanded 80 men in a battle on Sawang Hill, Verde Island on 9 March 1945. This unit has not been able to present any attachment papers from the US Forces under which they claim to have fought.
d. It is, therefore, recommended that the Batangas Town Battalion, AUSA be not favorably reconsidered and that this constitute the final determination of and action upon the claim for recognition of this unit.

[Sgd.] Lt George E. Kemper

Concur: Capt E. R. Curtis, Chief, Unit Branch


Notes and references:
1 “Batangas Town Bn, AUSA,” File No. 48, online at the United States National Archives.

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